• Location
    La Rhumerie
  • Address
    166 boulevard Saint-Germain, Paris 6e
  • Link
  • Metro
    Ligne 10 : Mabillon
  • RER
    Saint Michel
  • Vélib'
    Dante, 9 Rue Dante/ 39 Rue des Écoles/ 20 Rue du Sommerard, Paris 5e
  • Autolib'
    3 rue de Vaugirard, Paris 6e/ 133 rue Saint-Jacques/ 7 Place Paul Painlevé, Paris 5e

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Rhumerie born under the name “Rhumerie Martiniquaise” was created in 1932 by Joseph Louville.
After the murderous roar of the war, Joseph Louville, a pure-class West Indian, made his humanities on the continent. His license brilliantly passed in Bordeaux, he became a bailiff, then a notary.
But this man curious about everything, the poet’s heart, Rousseau’s soul, was astonished and distressed by the fact that his contemporaries of the metropolis for the most part disregard the sweetness of the West Indies, the richness of his soil, the spectacle of his landscapes enchanters.
On May 6, 1931, the president Gaston Doumergue, radical-socialist, inaugurated with great republican pumps, the Colonial Exhibition established in Vincennes, a light-hearted exhibition which will seduce 22 million visitors.

Joseph Louville, bought at 166 boulevard Saint-Germain the shop of an antique dealer and inaugurated with his three sons Albert, Jules and Servulle: Martinique Rhumerie, which becomes La Rhumerie not to attribute the virtues of rum to a single island . After the Second World War, Parisians rediscover their city.

In Saint Germain des Prés, a festive, cultural and artistic atmosphere is gradually being set up. The rising tide of existentialism is imposed on one side by the literary cafes with Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone De Beauvoir and on the other side with the cellars where Greco, Mouloudji sang … and where the Jazz Men performed: Sidney Bechet, Claude Lutter and many others …
The Louville brothers welcomed squads of celebrities: Henri Salvador, George Bataille, Antonin Artaud, Marcel Aymé, Man Ray … broke students, bohemians.